Kingston Single Malt Society

A place for you to meet with good friends over a fine single malt whiskey.

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Glengarry Highland Games Aug 2-3, 2013

Posted by Bill Gorham on July 16, 2013 at 1:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Bill Somerville of Gordon & MacPhail and Frank McDonald of Companions of the Quaich will take you on a tour of Scotland stopping at 6 different distilleries, where you will sample a 100 years of whisky without ever having to leave the Highland Games.Sit back and enjoy each dram and hear about the history and whisky making process of each distillery.Your appreciation and understanding of the industry will grow as you get more exposed to the various influences on the final product; geographic area,method of aging and cask type used. Seating is available at $40.00 per person. Reservations are highly recommended. For more information or to reserve a seat please contact Frank McDonald at [email protected]

The Metcalfe Center (Upstairs)Saturday August 3rd at 2:00pm and 4:00pm

Check out the flyer at GlenGarry Higland Games

http://www.glengarryhighlandgames.com

Scotch in a Can: Whisky Maker Scottish Spirits adds aluminum siding to liquor

Posted by Bill Gorham on January 4, 2012 at 10:15 AM Comments comments (0)

Scotch in a Can: Whisky Maker Scottish Spirits adds aluminum siding to liquor

 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/02/scotch-in-a-can_n_1175256.html

Source: Huffington Post

1/2/12

 

 

Canned haggis isn't the only aluminum-packaged Scottish export guaranteed to raise eyebrows at a dinner party.

Scotch whisky will soon be sold in a can in the United States, putting a liquor prized for its pedigree and price into a humble container known for its affordability and portability.

"There are many brands on the market and most brands are not created equal," Ken Rubenfeld, vice president of operations for Scottish Spirits Imports, Inc., told The Huffington Post. "But most brands are served as equals in a glass type of vessel."


"Having something that's so creatively different -- it piques the curiosity."


Each can of Scottish Spirits will contain 12 ounces -- about eight shots -- of 80-proof "single grain scotch whisky," distilled and matured for three years in oak casks in Scotland, according to Rubenfeld. The company hopes to have its cans on shelves in major American markets by Feb. 1, retailing for $5 apiece.


Packaging a high-end variety of liquor in what is widely considered to be a low budget container sounds like a novelty. But Rubenfeld insists its convenience -- not comic value -- that will drive sales.


"A lot of people like to have beverages by their pool, on their boat, in a campground, at sporting events or tailgate parties," he said. "It's easier to bring a six pack of a beverage verses bringing a bottle of scotch."


For some, canned beverages carry a low-class stigma. But they don't necessarily mean low quality. In recent years, some microbreweries have turned to cans for reasons including cost, drinkability and sustainability.


"They are opaque, they are completely airtight, and the liners are pretty darn good," said Lew Bryson, managing editor of Whisky Advocate magazine. "It is not going to be affecting the flavor. The problem you run into is who is going to bang out 12 ounces in an evening?"


Unlike bottles, cans cannot be closed after they have been opened. That will force Scottish Spirits drinkers to either finish all 8 shots of the blended scotch in a single occasion, or let some of the booze go to waste.


Critics have argued that eight shots of a beverage with the same alcohol content as venerable scotches including Johnnie Walker Blue and The Glenlivet 12 is too many to be sold in a container that can't be resealed.


But Rubenfeld insists his product does not encourage binge drinking, arguing that consumers will know it should be sipped like Dewars, not gulped like Dr. Pepper.


"We want people to be responsible -- this is 12 fluid ounces of scotch whisky and people should treat it as such," he said. "I would think that your readers and most people of common sense would know that that's a lot of alcohol. They'll crack it open and pour it with Coke or some kind of mixer and have fun with it with their friends."


Soon after the beverage's U.S. release, Scottish Spirits hopes to begin shipping the cans with an attachment that allows them to be resealed, however a spokeswoman said the brand has not yet developed a design for a resealable top that meets company standards. (A can sent to The Huffington Post newsroom did not feature any attachment for resealing the drink).


"When the top is perfected, people will maybe have half a can with their friends and save the rest," said Rubenfeld.


Nearly a year ago, an organization that oversees scotch whisky manufacturing had harsh words for Scottish Spirits, claiming its canned beverage might not qualify as real scotch.


Rubenfeld says his company, which maintains an office in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. and is part of a larger company based in the Cayman Islands, has "worked diligently to meet every requirement" outlined by the Scotch Whisky Association and codified by 2009's Scotch Whisky Regulations.


Campbell Evans, a spokesman for the SWA, could not immediately confirm that Scottish Spirits has achieved certification as a true scotch whisky, stating he has not yet examined the beverage.


But Evans says the packaging isn't the problem.


"There is no reason why a product that is a genuine Single Grain Scotch Whisky cannot be sold in a can," Evans said.


Some whisky experts have reservations about the packaging, but Brad Danler, general manager of the Brooklyn, N.Y. whisky bar and restaurant Char No. 4, says it's what's on the inside that counts.


"I understand why beer makes sense going back into cans, but with whisky it's certainly a surprise," said Danler. "I can't say that it makes much sense to me, but if it is delicious, then I will gladly crack one open and enjoy 12 ounces."

Review: The Black Grouse

Posted by Roberto on November 2, 2010 at 12:59 PM Comments comments (0)

Review: The Black Grouse

October 28th, 2010 - John Hansell

The Black Grouse, 40%, $29

One might assume this to be just a smoky version of the standard Famous Grouse (with its honeyed malt, bright fruit, and floral demeanor). But, in addition to the enhanced smoke (which caringly adds a new dimension without smothering the other flavors), there also seems to be more malt body and oak spice in the mix, which I think takes Black Grouse to a higher level than Famous Grouse. The grain whisky contributes a “drinkability” component, making it a great introduction to smoky whiskies. Advanced Malt Advocate magazine rating: 86

Highland Park 16 yr

Posted by Bill Gorham on August 27, 2010 at 10:14 PM Comments comments (0)

From The Scotch Blog

By Ryan on August 16, 2010 9:13 PM


On my way to North Carolina, I discovered this sweet liquid in the Toronto International Airport Duty Free Shop. Matured in old bourbon and married in oloroso sherry casks, Highland Park created this expression strictly for the "global travel retail market."

 

Had I known at this little tidbit at the time I would've picked up an extra bottle! 

Regrettably, the 1 litre bottle lasted me about a week and if you're fortunate enough to find it during your travels: buy two and squirrel one away.

 


Nose: Citrus peel, cereal, hints of smoke.

 


Palate: Soft and almost creamy mouthfeel flavoured by honey-sweetened malty cereal and tingling citrus with smoke arriving just before the finish.

 


Finish: Delicate smoke and peat are wrapped in a long-lasting, sweet and mouth-filling sherry finish.

 


Overall: Pleasantly light, well-balanced and smooth this whisky did me wonders on the veranda at Holden Beach, North Carolina, this past week. Terrific with pecan pie, this "Island-infused" dram kept me company on long walks on the beach at night and, of course, it is best enjoyed with a tiny splash of water to really bring out the aromas.  

 


Highland Park discontinued the 16 yr in April of this year, so if the notes above pique your interest, act fast.

 


Century Old Scotch found in Antarctic.

Posted by Bill Gorham on August 13, 2010 at 6:44 PM Comments comments (0)


One of the crates of the Scotch whisky that was trapped in Antarctic ice for a century was finally opened Friday, Aug. 13, 2010 but the heritage dram won't be tasted by whisky lovers because it's being preserved for its historic significance. (AP / Antarctic Heritage Trust)

 

The Associated Press

Date: Friday Aug. 13, 2010 10:59 AM ET


WELLINGTON, New Zealand — A crate of Scotch whisky that was trapped in Antarctic ice for a century was finally opened Friday — but the heritage dram won't be tasted by whisky lovers because it's being preserved for its historic significance.


The crate, recovered from the Antarctic hut of renowned explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton after it was found there in 2006, has been thawed very slowly in recent weeks at the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch on New Zealand's South Island.

The crate was painstakingly opened to reveal 11 bottles of Mackinlay's Scotch whisky, wrapped in paper and straw to protect them from the rigors of a rough trip to Antarctica for Shackleton's 1907 Nimrod expedition.


Though the crate was frozen solid when it was retrieved earlier this year, the whisky inside could be heard sloshing around in the bottles. Antarctica's minus 22 Fahrenheit (-30 Celsius) temperature was not enough to freeze the liquor, dating from 1896 or 1897 and described as being in remarkably good condition.

This Scotch is unlikely ever to be tasted, but master blenders will examine samples of it to see if they can replicate the brew. The original recipe for the Scotch no longer exists.


Once samples have been extracted and sent to Scottish distiller Whyte and Mackay, which took over Mackinlay's distillery many years ago, the 11 bottles will be returned to their home — under the floorboards of Shackleton's hut at Cape Royds on Ross Island, near Antarctica's McMurdo Sound.


Whisky lover Michael Milne, a Scot who runs the Whisky Galore liquor outlet in Christchurch, described the rare event as a great experience.


"I just looked at this (crate) and honestly, my heartbeat went up about three paces. It was amazing," he said. "The box was like a pioneer's box with the wood and nails coming out," he said.


Although Milne said he'd give anything to have a taste of the whisky. "It is not going to happen and I am not going to get excited about it," he said. "But if there was ever an opportunity, it could be a wonderful one to have."


Nigel Watson, executive director of the Antarctic Heritage Trust, which is restoring the explorer's hut, said opening the crate was a delicate process.


The crate will remain in cold storage and each of the 11 bottles will be carefully assessed and conserved over the next few weeks. Some samples will be extracted, possibly using a syringe through the bottles' cork stoppers.

 

From Article on CTV at:

http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20100722/frozen-whisky-100722/



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